Limited Expectations

The miracle of Jairus’ 12 year old daughter’s “rise from death” deserves a closer look since it is a story of limited expectations.  God thru Jesus unexpectedly raised her from the dead, similarly to Lazarus’ resurrection which shocked the popular senses. Both Martha and Mary somehow knew that had Jesus been there earlier, their brother, Lazarus, would not have died. They believed that much in His healing powers.  As for the resurrection, that is an eschatological event but never expected before then. [How often theology gets in the way of faith!]

Then Martha said to Jesus, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother wouldn’t have died. … … Martha said to him, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day.”  – John 11:21, 24 & 32

We know that Jairus did not anticipated Jesus arriving at his house after his daughter’s passing. vs 42, “she was dying….” Jairus knew that his princess, his life’s source of joy, was near death, [but still alive.  He was desperate now.]

He fell down at Jesus’s feet and pleaded with him [Jesus] to come to his house, …. Luke 8:41-21

But someone came to him with an update,

Your daughter is dead. Don’t … [annoy] the teacher … [any longer].” — Luke 8:49.

I didn’t know God was annoyed by our supplications especially if it concerns our children! The “messenger” informed Jairus possibly over the noise of an excited crowd of followers.

The record says of them: [vs 40] “When Jesus returned, the crowd welcomed him, for they were all expecting him.” (We do tend to welcome Him more readily if we have been waiting on Him.)

Jesus heard” [vs 50] are one of my favorite phrases in the Bible. We need to learn, perhaps, to trust Him in matters that frighten us into thinking the unthinkable.

This is the confidence we have before him: If we ask anything according to his will, he hears us. – 1 John 5:14

Luke’s account adds:  Only the parents and Peter, John & James were welcomed to join Him into her bedroom where she lay in state but Jesus claimed was only asleep. [How transparent is truth. vs. 51. “and the child’s father [oh, yes,] and mother.” The value of this verse awaits another blog.]

A group of mourners had gathered in the living room of the house beating their chests and wailing loudly [vs 52]. “We can easily imagine how great a din.” writes J. P. Lange.  [They went from mourning to laughing—not exactly typical of a truly broken heart. vs. 53]

This was unlike the cry of those mothers who saw their infant sons thrust through by King Herod while Jesus was secretly swept away into the protection of an Egyptian exile until the king died. In the Christmas story: “A voice was heard in Ramah, [a] great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children; and she refused to be consoled…..” [Mt 2:18] The language in this account is not a public display like the gathering at Jairus’s house but a private and unsharable pain that only God is merciful enough to hear.

When Jesus took her by the hand, sat her up, and instructed them to feed her [vs. 56] her parents were “astounded”!  This is not the voice of praise but the sound of a limited expectation of God’s loving involvement in a traumatic loss.  Let faith reveal untold possibilities that God might do for us.  We might not know what God is going to do when we pray but let’s not be so surprised when He does it.

 

 

 

 

 

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Abandoned

There were, they say, 7 sayings from the Cross Jesus uttered while He hanged there dying for my sins—and yours.⁠1  Though some scholars question whether or not His declaration of our forgiveness was not added until later,2 we may say that Jesus’s reflections were all about others and not Himself as He was suspended there dying. Was there one exception, though, when in a moment of unprecedented vulnerability He felt absolutely abandoned—left to die alone.

About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out with a loud voice, “Elí, Elí, lemá [lima, lama] sabachtháni ? ” that is, “My God, my God, why have you abandoned me ?” Matthew 27:46

I am amazed at the indifference and insensitivity of those assembled on the hill at the time, trying to decide if He spoke of Elijah. In recent times scholars analyzed His words: were they more Hebrew or Aramaic. [Matthew said part of each; Mark said: only Aramaic]. Perhaps, His voice was slurred while He labored to say anything! Let’s not  focus on how He said it but what He said—and maybe, why.  

Passer-bys were hurling insults at Him,⁠3  priests, scribes, and pharisees in concert mocked Him⁠4 like so many fifth graders finding His pain a cause of amusement, the two thieves on either side “taunted him.⁠5

And did the Father abandon the Savior while He spent three long, endless hours, seemingly outside time, awaiting death? Abandonment does not mean forgotten, however.

Forgotten?

The Scripture does not record that the Father became disinterested or indifferent to Jesus’s plight. This Jesus was the theme of all Scripture, every Word which the Spirit inspired and directed prophets to write about!

And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself. – Luke 24:27

..And this is God’s ONLY Son! With His son on His mind throughout recorded time, is it conceivable Jesus would be forgotten on this day of all days?!

I have three sons whose picture hangs over our piano in the living room and also—of all places—in our bathroom.  I cannot take a bath without thinking of them and praying for them. God doesn’t hang pictures but He does have the names of His children tattooed on His palms!⁠6 

Can a woman forget her nursing child, or lack compassion for the child of her womb? Even if these forget, yet I will not forget you. “Look, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands; your walls are continually before me. – Isaiah 49:15-16

It seems incredulous to suppose God was not mindful of what was happening on Calvary.⁠7 But being aware of one’s suffering and doing something about it are two different things.

 

Abandoned

The word “abandonment” suggests that Jesus died “alone” with no one to comfort Him or plead His case before heaven’s throne.  While He became the sin offering for the sins of the world,8 there were no angels coming to His rescue. But to say the Father “deserted” Jesus on the Cross assigns a nuance to this word that contradicts God’s great heart toward His son. The Father’s involvement in Calvary was through His Son. They agreed on this plan. Their counsel together led to this moment. The great divine heart beat very much in sync with the Savior’s.

After his anguish, … he will receive the … spoil,⁠9 because he willingly submitted to death, and … he bore the sin of many….⁠10 

In Our Place

The theology states that Jesus died for our sins so that we would not have to.  It is called the Vicarious Atonement, “to give his life as a ransom for many.” [Matthew 20:28] And does not a vicarious atonement speak to a divine provision that is more than expunging the account of past sins? His death was vicarious in another sense: He was abandoned so we would never be!  

…for he himself has said, I will never leave you or abandon you. – Hebrews 13:5

And remember, [see] I am with you always, [all the days] to the end of the age – Matthew 20:28

Turns out that here, too, His thoughts we on us!


1Seven sayings

  1. Luke 23:34: Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.
  2. Luke 23:43: Verily, I say unto you today, thou shalt be with me in paradise.
  3. John 19:26–27: Woman, behold thy son. (Says to disciple) Behold thy mother.
  4. Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34: My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?
  5. John 19:28: I thirst.
  6. John 19:30: It is finished.
  7. Luke 23:46: Father, into thy hands I commit my spirit.

2 Colossians 1:14 In him we have redemption, [through His blodd] the forgiveness of sins.
3 Matthew 27:39
4 Matthew 27:41 In the same way the chief priests, with the scribes and elders, [and Pharisees] mocked him
5 Matthew 27:44
6 Isaiah 49:16 Look, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands
7 Isaiah 53:11 He shall see of the travail of his soul…
8 2 Corinthians 5:21 He made the one who did not know sin to be sin [a sin offering] for us.
9 Colossians 2:15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.
10 Isaiah 53:11-12

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Women!

I have been reading the Greek New Testament devotionally. Instead of studying a text for blogging, I am just reading to see what I miss in the English.  English translations are great but because it is my native tongue, I tend to read over something I should probably be pondering. So, future blogs might give you a hint as to where I am in my devotional Bible reading (at least the New Testament). Well, today I read about Sadducean ignorance on the subject of wives and heaven:

Jesus answered them, “You are mistaken, because you don’t know the Scriptures or the power of God. or in the resurrection they neither marry nor are given in marriage but are like angels in heaven.” Matthew 22:29-30

The words, “the power of God” stuck out for the first time. As an old guy who spent a lifetime thinking about girls and finally, a wife, that phrase has special meaning! Almost my entire life has been mentally and emotionally dedicated to the fairer sex, at times, giving me a sense of guilt, thinking I should be more involved with God’s Word and prayer. (Not that I didn’t pray or study God’s Word …I did …a lot.)

But I cannot even imagine seeing my beloved in glory and just walking on by because she will then be no more or less important than anyone else.  If we hug, it would be a Christian hug, something I have never given my wife in this life.  (We hug but it’s romantic …at least, to me!)

I was taught that we should put God first!  In fact, Jesus spoke of hating our wives if we wanted to follow Him.

If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters ​— ​yes, and even his own life ​— ​he cannot be my disciple. – Luke 14:26

I never put my wife on  the same social level with my mom or dad—or any other family member.  Years  ago the old time preachers used to maintain with deep conviction the a wife is second to God! Wow!  I struggled with this.  My wife—not unlike a million other wives—wants to be—practically—worshipped.  They want to be number one in our lives and when it comes to God, my dearest wants only to be my equal in God’s plan now for both of us together.  And this always made sense to me.

And Now I Am Old – Psalm 37:25

My body now registers pains I never felt before and now my mind alone imagines what I can no longer engage in. But I still spend a considerable amount of time thinking of her.

I ache to hold her close to me.
I ache for things that used to be—
Strobed flashes of a memory
That lingers, lingers on.

My story now seems more and more
Of pains I never had before
While I indulge the joyous lore
Of playful times now gone.

Does old age come to claim its prize?
My body lives a thousand lies!
Yet she unchanged within my eyes
Still sings the siren’s song.

The Power of God

..But in heaven ..no wife …no thought of her …no romance… …nothing!!??  I spent a lifetime in this, another, world! Now I understand what Jesus was saying.  It will take the “power of God” to redefine our relationship as He intends.  God’s ability (power) in this matter far exceeds the natural imagination.  But can I imagine it anyways?

I will love her more then than now.  My love now will not be able to hold a candle to then; for, God’s desire toward her will gift me His love for her.  He will redefine romance in terms of that infinite and eternal source of all she must mean to Him!  Then, fellowship with her, thinking of her, wanting to be with her, and wanting all of God that I can have, will be  the same—joined in a divine matrimony as the Bride of Christ.

I can hardly wait.  If I love her now and think of her all of the time, now…. wait until then!!

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Did Luke Get It Wrong?

Regarding the time when Jesus was born, did Luke get it wrong?

In those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that the whole empire [the whole world] should be registered. This first registration took place while Quirinius was governing Syria. [Or This registration was the first while, or This registration was before] So everyone went to be registered, each to his own town. Luke 2:1-3 CSB

The Census of Quirinius

The Census of Quirinius was a census of Judea taken by Publius Sulpicius Quirinius, Roman governor of Syria (according to Josephus: after Archelaus, the son of Herod the Great, was removed from office and Judea was annexed to Syria.) This happened at least 8 years after Jesus’s birth.⁠1 

The Gospel of Luke … establishes the birth of Jesus during Quirinius’s governorship (Luke 2, Luke 2:1–5), but the Gospel of Matthew places the birth within the reign of Herod the Great, who died 9 years earlier. “No satisfactory explanation,” the wikipedia maintains, “of the contradiction seems possible, and most scholars think that the Gospel of Luke was in error.⁠2 Josephus3 however references a certain Judas the Galilean⁠4 that supports the Lukan account. And the conflict between the gospels is only alleged if we revisit the Lukan text with a truer historical reference in view.

Unsatisfactory explanations

Unsatisfactory explanations proliferated:

  • Luke got it wrong.
  • Quirinius instituted this census years earlier as a legate of Caesar and around the birth of the Savior. Quirinius was then the head of an imperial commission to gather the census. [Problem here is Luke gave him the title “governor,”⁠5 Luke 2:2]
  • Translate the word first in Luke 2:2⁠6 as before. “..this taxing was before… Quirinius was governor…” Problem is the word before⁠7 is a different word and the text is not in question using the Greek word first.⁠8
  • The word translated taxation⁠9 could also mean registration.⁠10 The registration took place, some say, at the time of the Savior’s birth but the actual taxing 11 years later during Quirinius’s governorship. This interpretation is unnecessarily forced.
  • The taxation was only a tax levied against the priests and Luke must have confused this with a more general Roman census. [Entirely arbitrary as theories go.]

A Greek Lesson

The word this in Luke 2:2, “thistook place while Quirinius was governing….” transliterates: haútâ but the accent marks are not inspired. What if the word Luke used was autá instead which is the same word with different accents and without the aspirant (the ‘h’). This is the word the in a reflexive sense, ie itself. Luke could have meant, the tax itself was made for the first time when Quirinius was governor of Syria. [A perfectly acceptable translation].

We could herein distinguish the decree or command to institute an enrollment from the actual enrollment itself. We believe this was what Luke said! Lange explains,

“Nothing prevents us from supposing that the [enrollment] was really ordered and begun at the Birth of Christ, but was interrupted in Judea for a time by the death of Herod, and the political changes consequent on that event, and subsequently resumed and carried out with greater energy under Cyrenius [Quirinius], so it might righty be said that to have been made, or completed, when [while] he was governor.”⁠11

The difficulty might be one of translation. Should we read verse 3 with the CSB “So everyone went to be registered” or the KJV “And all went to be taxed”? And since they were enrolled or registered for tax purposes this might be a distinction without a difference. It is acceptable to say then that what was started around Herod’s death and Jesus’s birth was finished during Quirinius’s governorship.

Another Possibility

Quirinius might have been twice governor of Syria, once for 3 years around the birth of the Savior (A.U. 750-753) and once about 6-11 years later (A.U. 760).⁠12A double legation … has recently been made almost certain..,” Lange informs us.⁠13 Perhaps Luke wrote, “This enrollment was when he first became governor.” [Implying more than one term—though the word first is more naturally interpreted as already given.] A second census was conducted during his second governorship in Syria. The second census would have been for Palestine (mentioned by Luke in Acts 5:37) after it became a Roman province during Quirinius’s second term ( A. U. 759).

Summary

It is certain,” Lange assures us, “that Augustus held at least three⁠14 census …of the empire.” The United States Census Bureau …conducts the U.S. Census every ten years, “which allocates the seats of the U.S. House of Representatives to the states based on their population. … The information provided by the census informs decisions on where to build and maintain schools, hospitals, transportation infrastructure, and police and fire departments,” according to Wikipedia.⁠15

What makes us conclude that Caesar would not be diligent to order a periodic census since he calculated the size of his army on this information as well as raised the revenue to maintain it!

To those who reject the message of Scripture on the chance it might show conflicting or errand historical records, I can only say, your soul’s eternal state depends on the message of this book and you have rejected it on the flimsiest of reasons.


1 J. P. Lange. The Gospel according to Luke, vol. VIII. page 31.
2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census_of_Quirinius
3 Yet was there one Judas, …who taking with him Saddouk, a Pharisee, became zealous to draw them to a revolt, who both said, that the taxation was no better than an introduction to slavery, and exhorted the nation to assert their liberty…. J. P. Lange. The Gospel according to Luke, vol. VIII. page 31.
4 Acts 5:37 [CSB] “After this man, Judas the Galilean rose up in the days of the census and attracted a following. He also perished, and all his followers were scattered.
5 The text uses a present participle showing concurrent action (ἡγεμονεύοντος) which says while he was governor…
6 (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)
7 πρότερον
8 Luke 2:2 uses πρώτη
9 ἡ ἀπογραφὴ
10 Thayer defines this in his dictionary, page 60, “an enrollment in the public records of persons together with their property and income, …that it might appear how much tax should be levied upon each.” Sound familiar?
11 J.P. Lange, page 32.
12 Ibid.
13 Ibid.
14 Ibid. pages 33
15 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Census_Bureau
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The Thing Speaks For Itself

There is a phrase in law, res ipsa loquitur, meaning, “The thing speaks for itself.” This recognizes that we already understand innately or instinctively whether our actions or words are appropriate or undeserved, healing or hurting, good or evil. [We probably picked up on this when Adam and Eve took that bite of forbidden fruit, likely, of the “Tree of The Knowledge of Good and Evil.”⁠1]

Perhaps, the door was opened by the ancient philosophers when they introduced what we call logic into our thought process and since then we have honed this intellectual tool to explain away something we shouldn’t do as justifiable. In the court of public opinion wrong is considered right when something is seen as normal. When everybody’s doing it, it must be okay.

Christians go a step further hoping that God’s grace will overlook something they [we?] did or said that was hurtfully wrong [and we knew it] but Christ went to the cross to forgive. “There is no condemnation to those in Christ,” St. Paul reminded us.  …but have we missed the part about “walking in the Spirit”!

There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. – Romans 12:1

This is not an exposé on this verse in Romans; so, we’ll save that idea, hopefully, for another day. This is a glaring look at another idea: Is the Bible clear about right and wrong or is there leeway in interpretation that gives us a certain freedom of action and word without sin. Francis Shaeffer of the L’Abri community in Switzerland referred to this as “freedom within limits.” If the Bible doesn’t clearly say it’s wrong, maybe it’s alright to do, …at least for me!

Res Ipsa Loquitur.
But sometimes the message is so obvious that to describe it is only an attempt at explaining it away. A biblical idea can always be set aside as an ancient cultural norm—no longer contemporary, even when we know it should be!

For example, how might we make Paul’s admonition any clearer: “Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace⁠2   Peace is a “state of tranquility …exempt from rage….”⁠3 The second verse in the NASB says how: “with all humility and gentleness, with patience, showing tolerance for one another in love.” We need no sermon to explain words like humility, gentleness, patience, tolerance, and love—unless we want to justify rage, unless we seek a definition of forgiveness that condones distancing ourselves from people we once loved. When I attempt lengthy explanations to defend what I know is evil, I effectively do an end-around conscience, and worse, I do a grave injustice to my best friend—me!

We live in a politically charged time and it is easier right now to hate than to love, to feel enraged rather than a desire to reconcile, to imagine a future without them rather than a nostalgia that wants them back in our lives.

The message of scripture is clearer than we, at times, wish to admit.  Mark Twain quipped, “It is not what I don’t know about the Bible that bothers me; it is what I know.” No one needs to explain to me a need to love and be loved. No one needs to clarify the role of peace in my relationships and how to encourage reconciliation and unity.  And conversely, I know when I am hurting others or attempting to end a once vibrant and meaningful relationship.

The thing speaks for itself.


1 Genesis 2:9; 3:6 The LORD God made all sorts of trees grow up from the ground—trees that were beautiful and that produced delicious fruit. In the middle of the garden he placed the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. … When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye, and also desirable for gaining wisdom, she took some and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.
2 Ephesians 4:3.
3 Joseph Thayer, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, page 182
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Controversial

I found it peculiar that after growing up around nothing but love that my adult experience should be filled with controversy.  I am not speaking politically because I carry no torch for any political party.  I am talking about my understanding of Scripture.

How so!?

I grew up believing the theological position that preacher after preacher maintained was the unvarnished—and only—truth.⁠1  [Maybe so!] But I discovered that the Creed is not that simple.

Atonement theory, foremost, scripturally the only subject that matters, must continue to be somewhat controversial because while we know Jesus had to die for our Salvation, we theorize the “how.” We know forgiveness of sins was tied to the shedding of blood—His blood [but how!]:

… the law requires that nearly everything be cleansed with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness. – Hebrews 9:22

Glen, an Episcopalian, and later Catholic, priest, recalled while in seminary:

“We were studying atonement theory, and I thought, ‘Was there not a better way to save humanity than to resort to human sacrifice?’ But we were not encouraged to ask those kinds of questions. This particular professor mocked those who did.”⁠2

Ken Daniels, after leaving the faith, questioned, “I can’t see why you couldn’t just forgive truly penitent people for their sins without requiring a blood sacrifice, just as humans forgive each other?”⁠3

But we don’t “just … forgive each other”! If we are intellectually honest we admit that forgiveness is more than a verbal consent.⁠4

Forgiveness is probably the biggest task God will ever ask of us!  …and just when we would rather not. [Right, Jonah?]

Christians are asked to emulate God in this matter, to forgive as you have been forgiven.⁠5 We have been given a new birth in Christ to empower us for this very act—and especially because we are so controversial!

There is more here than misunderstanding. Perhaps some hurts seem unforgettable. Perhaps, something painful still haunts us in unexplainable fears, moments of uncontrollable rage, orphaned desires that are not who we want to be! (Oh, how it hurts to be human!) The work on Calvary needed to address a boat-load of pain and hurt—that we cause to God and to one another.

the chastisement of our peace was upon him⁠6 

Did I say this wasn’t political?  Perhaps I was wrong about that.  We’ve never needed more to capture the lesson of divine forgiveness toward one another than in the political atmosphere that pervades the current mood of the day.

Perhaps, the best way to begin to understand how Christ’s death on Calvary could reconcile us to God and each other as well as provide for a “race-less” fellowship among us far stronger and more enduring than any other social bond—perhaps, the best way to understand the how—is to practice this forgiveness ourselves.


1 Not to put too fine a point on it; even the Greek grammar book of choice  in the colleges and seminaries was carefully chosen to have the syntax that harmoniously explained it. The Dana Mantey Greek Grammar was used in Baptist schools while J Grecham Machen was used in both Pentecostal and Catholic schools of higher learning.
Daniel Dennett; Linda LaScola. Caught in The Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind (Durham, NC:Pitchstone Publishing,2013), 49.
Kenneth W Daniels. Why I Believed: Reflections of a Former Missionary (Austin TX:Kenneth W. Daniels, 2010.), page 37.
On Luke 23:34 “Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing” the NIV footnotes correctly, “Some early manuscripts do not have this sentence.” “The absence of these words from …early and diverse witnesses … can scarcely be explained as a deliberate excision …that God had not forgiven the Jews.” Bruce Metzger, “A Textual Commentary of the Greek New Testament.
5 Matthew 6:12 And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors.
6 Isaiah 53:5
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My Poems Remind Me

Anyone who knows me and has seen my poems will be able to extract the message from the biographical history contained in them. But my primary reader—are you ready for this—is me. Much of what I have shared in verse are thoughts I must never forget.  My poems are written to remind me of the person I have become, how I got here.  They are written to encourage me to hold on tight in faith to the God who has walked beside all these years. If I may, let me extract a few lines from a few poems to expand.

Perhaps, I should start with something someone else wrote, put to music, and then passed on where it was sung over 200 times by a group of teenagers in upstate New York at a youth camp.  I remember the chorus. Here’s how we sang it:

Lord don't let me fail, I want to make the bride,
When my way is dark, keep me by your side
When my faith is weak, only let me see,
Something in my life, that You have done for me.

Life is filled with challenge.  Our faith in God and His provisions is mockingly questioned by a culture that finds Bible based principles hopelessly olde worlde.  Admittedly, we must with resolute conviction stand up in the controversial social winds that  blow.

and having done all, to stand. Stand 
therefore... Ephesians 6:13b-14a [KJV]

I took to verse to remind myself always that my faith wants the support of my testimony. In “Reflections” I wrote

The signposts left along the way
Are markers where I stopped to pray
Enlisting angels in the strife—
A testimonial to my life.

In “I Miss the Good Old Days” I reminded myself of the youth camp experience and the months that followed at an old fashion altar:

I really miss the good old days.
My faith is not a fraud!
My soul reached out in simple praise
To touch the heart of God.

When youthful hearts at altar rails
Beat strong in simple praise,
Not harrowed with presumed details
Of science—now the rage.

When spiritual things were wondrous new
And Jesus then was awed,
Back then there was one thing to do:
I lived to worship God.

In “The Child I Was” I encouraged myself to hold tight to those early days of my new found love for the Savior: [Start children off on the way they should go, and even when they are old they will not turn from it. – Proverbs 22:6]

There’s an adage told which was true of old
In the record of history:
That the child I was and the child I am 
is the child I’ll always be.

And now I’m old and if truth be told
I’ll be forever glad:
How I fell in love with the Word of God 
when I was but a lad.

The desire to pray I have today
And which is a part of me
Is the child I was and the child I am and 
the child I’ll always be.

I am 75 years along the way and there are far fewer steps out of the woods ahead than behind. My prayer daily is, “Lord, remind me of all you have done for me.” My prayer always:

Show me your ways, LORD, teach me your paths. - Psalm 25:4

In “As Enoch Walked” I prayed:

Lord, keep me from mere self pursuit
With Heaven out of view
Instead may I stay true through life
By walking close to You.

Amen.

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How I Know God Is Real.

How do I know God is real and that He cares about me?  The evidence is anecdotal rather than hard scientific “fact.” But think of it: if God is real to me, it means that He is in someway in my life and sharing my experiences.  That’s the quintessential definition of “anecdotal.” To depend on “science” for answers is to expect God to be a part of the science ..but He was the creator of it (its author) not the science itself. If you comb the heavens to find God, you will see His handiwork but not Him.  He dwells among His people!

And without faith it is impossible to please 
God, because anyone who comes to him must 
believe that he exists and that he rewards 
those who earnestly seek him. Hebrews 11:6

Why depend on a faith in the science that God made when we can have that faith in Him directly? God affects creation. He is not affected by it.


In 1967 with daddy near death, I traveled home from college to begin the summer’s task of working for the city of Buffalo, NY. at a housing development: mowing lawns and burning trash. I was 22 and a believer but not at all happy. The job was difficult for me—life was difficult:  dad was dying from a bad heart; my younger sister and mom argued a lot; mom needed an operation; and this job stunk—oh, did I mention, I proposed marriage to “my girl” and she said, “No.”

So, I got on a Greyhound bus and headed back to school under the pretense I was looking for better work. (I was self-deceived and desperate.) There is no work in Montgomery county, PA. for a boy without wheels. The bus would drop me off at the end of the country lane that connected to campus and I would walk it alone, now utterly despondent and without a clue. What now?

Let’s just stop here. If something encouraging could happen here that could not have been anticipated or planned, might we think God was alert to my reckless behavior and He interceded? I had been home almost 4 weeks (from memorial day to June 21, the day I went back). School was in summer recess (a ghost town) and not even the faculty members who lived on campus could be seen.

But just off the main path, out in the open, painting the side of an old shack for a little extra cash, was my Greek teacher, Rev. Grazier, the one faculty member I had connected with the past 3 semesters at school.  He lived in or near Conchohocken, PA. around 40 minutes drive to the school. I would never have guessed to see him there.

He was the one person I would have arranged to see, however, if I had arranged anything but I had no way of reaching him nor did I think to. He was the one person God could use to speak to my soul, to encourage me to do the right thing and go home, to let God work out the knot in the tangled thoughts in my mind. (Sadly, daddy would die June 23.)

(Years later, I would call Rev. Grazier for more advice.  He even came to our wedding reception!  He missed the wedding—traffic.)

I called mom after conversing with my Greek professor and left for home. He “proved to be an encouragement to me.” [Colossians 4:11 CSB]

Would God ever step in to simply put His arm about me and encourage me to “wait on Him”? I have no doubts any more.

Guide me in your truth and teach me, for you
are the God of my salvation; I wait for you
all day long. [Psalm 25:5 CSB]
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Free or Freedom

The recent election—still in dispute—was more than a question of differing ideologies, promises, or achievements. The bigger issue which America should be pondering is the question of “free” or “freedom.” Do we want free government provisions or should we be more interested—whatever the personal cost— in freedom.

Is there no conflict between these? I am officially “old” by some standards and wouldn’t mind my medical expenses, including drugs, being totally free. I wouldn’t mind a government check to liquidate my mortgage. I wouldn’t mind waiving property taxes on my home. ..and on and on I could go, but are their attached conditions that would give pause? I think I could get free dental but my dentist, whose office is within walking distance, is not on the list of dentists that provide this. My cancer treatment in Canada would have cost me nothing—as a canadian—but my oncologist informed me that I would be waiting months more before it would begin. (All tests show my cancer in regression.)

To be honest with ourselves, we need to define “freedom” before a comparison with “free” can be made. That definition is well stated in the U.S. Constitution. If this document is altered, even by amendment, or ignored or contradicted by statutory law, or in any way revisited or rewritten, the definition of freedom is changed. Freedom is defined in the U.S. Constitution. I see it primarily in a few lines—and nuanced in the remaining parts—of this document for which much blood has been shed, not to safeguard our democracy but to protect our freedom.

Consider: The U.S. Constitution describes a federated form of government which was and remains an agreement among, now, 50 independent states—all having an equal say in its construction. It’s uniqueness on the world stage is founded on three principle provisions:

  1. As a federation of states:
    1. the provisions of the 10th and 14th amendments,
    2. a Senate of 2 elected office holders from each state, and
    3. the electoral college. Even the smallest state is equally represented.
  2. The First amendment which enumerates 5 freedoms:
    1. Freedom of religion. The government shall make no laws regulating the establishment of religion.
    2. Freedom of the press
    3. Freedom of speech
    4. Freedom of assembly and
    5. Freedom to complain about the government or the right of petition to redress grievances without reprisal.
  3. And, most importantly 3 separate but equal branches of the federal government:
    1. The Executive, the President (One person, not an oligarchy or a hegemony) at the helm whose direction defines the direction for the country under their administration. They do not make laws, they implement and enforce them through their leadership.
    2. The Legislature makes the laws and approves a budget. And what must not be politically controlled:
    3. A Judiciary as a separate nonpartisan branch of government to interpret both constitutional and statutory law.

Freedom best thrives in a free market society in which we contribute to and participate in our  citizenship. If we want “free,” consider carefully the cost to our “freedom” which President Reagan once warned …is never more than one generation away from extinction.”[1]


[1] https://youtu.be/SDouNtnR_IA

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The Bible Contract for Marriage

The biblical idea behind marriage included procreation but its primary gift to society was the intimacy (“one flesh”)⁠1 possible between a man and a woman if they cared enough to discover it over the course of a lifetime. This social contract loses its force within the context of gay relations. Civilized society has broken the biblical arrangement for marriage—not only

  • by welcoming gay marriage as a norm but—consider the following—
  • by separating the social contract from its consummation [the marriage of virgins],
  • by a disregard for the intimacy associated with a henotic relationship (the one flesh idea proffered in Scripture),
  • by a casualness in sexual relations,
  • by the availability of a legally prevalent and ubiquitous, unchallenged, no fault, divorce,2 and
  • by legalized prostitution.

All of these are not only socially acceptable but are promoted without apology through the TV media, in academia, and now even in the church.

Prostitution

Speaking of prostitution: It is now considered a career choice for younger women—perhaps working their way through college. The Bible, both Old and New Testament, uses it metaphorically as an example of Israel’s unfaithfulness in relationship with God. Prostitution must be within the Divine Law categorically forbidden.⁠3 The distinction made in English between “married,” adultery, and “unmarried,” fornication, does not exist in Biblical Hebrew.

Maidenhood

Even the Hebrew word for a newly married young woman incorrectly loses its ancient cultural setting and allowed to include any young woman regardless of how sexually active she might be.⁠4 It is more difficult, though, to maintain this position in Genesis 24 when Abraham’s eldest servant finds a “young woman” to wed Isaac. That she would have been a virgin of marriageable age is unquestioned.⁠5 The distinction in Biblical Hebrew between eligibility for marriage and virginity⁠6 does not exist. Some reason that Mary, according to the prophecy was a “young maiden,” not a virgin, else, the word for virgin would have been used.⁠7 No one doubts Mary’s virginity upon marriage. The angel clarified that point to Joseph⁠7 but the catholic faith maintains that she remained a virgin throughout her lifetime. The words do not rule this out.

Though now considered archaic, a maiden was a girl or young woman, especially an unmarried one or a virgin.

The Marriage Bond

Marriage, as a bond, is solely a legal requirement.  We wed for the tax breaks or to get into the ICU for a visit with a hospitalized spouse. In a modern civilized culture marriage is, therefore, open to an interpretation which may include gay relations—and, who knows: polyamory might be a few years away.

Believers who perhaps cannot claim the “Adam and Eve” experience can and should endorse that possibility for others, especially their children. Just because we may have had to negotiate the deep swirling waters of marital discord doesn’t mean they shouldn’t take the bridge.


1 Genesis 2:24
2 Malachi 2:16 NLT “For I hate divorce!” says the LORD, the God of Israel. “To divorce your wife is to overwhelm her with cruelty,” says the LORD of Heaven’s Armies. “So guard your heart; do not be unfaithful to your wife.”
3 Exodus 34:14-15a Do not worship any other god, for the LORD, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God.“Be careful not to make a treaty with those who live in the land; for when they prostitute themselves to their gods…
4 The RSV of Isaiah 7:14 uses the phrase young woman:Behold, a young woman shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Imman’u-el.” Most english versions read “virgin.
5 Genesis 24:43 See, I am standing beside this spring. If a young woman comes out to draw water and I say to her, “Please let me drink a little water from your jar,
6 see Leviticus 21:14 where the words are clearly distinguished: אַלְמָנָ֤ה וּגְרוּשָׁה֙ וַחֲלָלָ֣ה זֹנָ֔ה אֶת־אֵ֖לֶּה לֹ֣א יִקָּ֑ח כִּ֛י אִם־בְּתוּלָ֥ה מֵעַמָּ֖יו יִקַּ֥ח אִשָּֽׁה׃
7 The Hebrew provides a word for virgin: הַבְּתוּלָה
8 Matthew 1:20 But after he had considered this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit.
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